Photo Friday: Vietnam

In 2006, we spent a month in Vietnam. We crossed the border from China in the north near Sapa, where we spent an amazing few days amongst the Hmong people and their beautifully terraced rice fields. Next we ventured down to Hanoi, and then spent a few days on a boat in the Halong Bay. Afterwards we made our way south, but for now we have plenty of photos to show of Northern Vietnam. If you find yourself wandering around Southeast Asia, don’t miss this amazing country, especially Sapa (sometimes spelled “Sa Pa”) and the surrounding areas.

Phil In The Blank

Phil Paoletta is a guy after our own hearts, simply because he willingly chose to go to West Africa. It’s an amazing place, and if you read Phil’s awesomely named blog, Phil in the Blank, you’ll get a sense of what it’s like. Don’t let his “loose stool count” scare you away. Seriously.

Photo Friday: Ethiopia

Despite what you may have heard, Ethiopia is not starving. It is green, lush, and full of life and culture. It is diverse and amazing. From the highlands in the north to the tribal lands of the south, to the religious and historical sites to the stunning landscapes, Ethiopia offers something for everyone. We spent a month in the country. You should, too.

Photo Friday: Morocco

Morocco: an exotic land of yummy Tagine, the Atlas Mountains, the Sahara, and maze-like medinas. This is where Europe meets Africa, and the land of the Moors. If you haven’t been, hopefully these photos will inspire you to include it in your next itinerary.

Taking Better Travel Photos

There’s no doubt that photography and travel go hand in hand. Many travelers hold their cameras as close to their hearts as their passports. But how do you snap those perfect images to capture the best moments of your trip? We’ve put together a few tips and resources to help you create the best travel photos for your trip album.

Syria: Extreme Friendliness

Because the U.S. Dollar is so strong against the Syrian Pound, we found ourselves much wealthier than our Syrian counterparts. Despite this, the local people treated us as if we were the guests of honor to be looked after and taken care of – and they were not after our money. We were invited into homes for lunch, given free food at restaurants, and taken on free tours of historic sites.

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