A Travel Comparison for Vacations, Honeymoons, and Tours Uruguay vs. Bolivia

Should you visit Uruguay or Bolivia?

Uruguay is much smaller than the rest of the Spanish speaking countries in South America. Many travellers ignore it and prefer to visit more popular destinations. Yet after two centuries living in the shadow of its neighbors, Uruguay is finally getting a little well-deserved recognition. Whether it is in Punta del Este or other satellite towns such as La Barra, Manantiales and Jose Ignacio, Uruguay's summer scene is about the beach. The beach destinations along the country's Atlantic coast are simply marvelous. However Uruguay also offers many other outdoors activities in its underpopulated landscape. From taking on the waves at Punta del Diablo, trekking with gauchos in Tacuarembo to kitesurfing at Laguna Garzon or hot air ballooning over vineyards, Uruguay's outdoor is opened to you and you might even end up being the only one there!

Thanks to Uruguayans' relaxed attitude toward life, Montevideo is a very chilled-out capital. Montevideo is a combination of colonial architecture, low-rise skyscrapers and 15 miles of beach-side rambla. Still wonder why it is home to about half the country's population? Even though the walkable city has a very sedated pace, it contains many great attractions to keep you busy, including picturesque Ciudad Vieja and Barrio Sur neighborhoods and the fun if sometimes overrun Mercado del Puerto market. As a prime beef exporter and consumer, Uruguayans take barbecues just as seriously as their Argentine neighbors. Expect to eat enormous amounts of tasty meat! Uruguay's Carnaval is also great fun! The two-month celebration, which starts mid-January, is largely based on candombe, dance and rhythms devised by African slaves in the 19th century. Drumming and energetic dancing are at the heart of every street party, a more grassroots affair than its Brazilian cousin. Visit Colonia del Sacramento and its Havana-esque ambiance that will take you back to the 1680's when it was founded by the Portuguese. This sleepy riverside town is one of Uruguay's oldest and has managed to preserve its 17th-century convent, lighthouse and drawbridge in the UNESCO-protected Barrio Historico. Another of the many laid-back town of Uruguay is Carmelo, which takes relaxing to a heightened level of chic. Located upriver and surrounded by vineyards and olive groves, visitors are entertained by water sports, golf, horse racing and polo.

The reasons to visit Bolivia are also abundant. While it's true that much of Bolivia isn't set up for tourism, those willing to go on this less traveled adventure are rewarded with eye-opening experiences, breathtaking activities, and stunning photo opportunities, not to mention fabulous stories to tell back home. On thing Uruguay and Bolivia have in common is that friendliness in both countries is reciprocal. Despite the widespread poverty in Bolivia, there is a amazing energy from locals eager to share the beauty of their country. In Uruguay and Bolivia, gracious hospitality and warm smiles are given to tourists who show respect, consideration and a genuine interest toward the local way of life. Contrary to what you may have heard, Bolivian food does not only consist in rice and beans but include meat, corn, eggs, potatoes and the "superfood" quinoa, one of the most commonly used ingredients in Bolivian cooking. Traditional dishes come from a mixture of Spanish cuisine and indigenous ingredients and include a lot of spice.

On the contrary to Uruguay, Bolivia is a country of extremes. From freezing cold snowy mountain peaks to sweltering hot amazon lowlands, the country has a great array of climates and cultures, attractions and adventures. With its high altitude cities and glistening lakeside villages, Bolivia's landscapes are incredibly diverse. From spectacular dusty red mountains and beautiful lakes to the dense Amazon jungle or the stunning Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia's transcendent scenery is breathtaking at every turn. This makes Bolivia one of the most bio-diverse countries on the planet and has about thousands of species of birds, animals, fish, reptiles and amphibians, which travelers can encounter during their trip if they pay attention. Bolivia is also a budget traveler's paradise that offers the best value for money in South America. You can eat well, sleep comfortably, purchase souvenirs and experience many of the activities and tours on offer without having to worry about money. Steeped in history and with indigenous culture everywhere, Bolivia will not disappoint you. The country's ability to combine a modern lifestyle with traditional values is truly wonderful. Ancient Andean customs are still practiced by many indigenous Bolivians who wear traditional dress and use natural remedies to treat illnesses. Catching a glimpse of the 36 indigenous cultures present in Bolivia, each with their own customs and most with their own languages, really makes an impression.. Finally, from the spiritual and traditional, to the more wild and westernized, Bolivia's festivals are unique, colorful and fun. If you can, travel to Bolivia during the Oruro Carnaval, a fantastic experience for any fun loving traveler.

Which country is cheaper, Bolivia or Uruguay?

Should I visit Uruguay or Bolivia? This is a popular question for many travelers. By figuring out which country is more expensive, you'll understand where you'll get more bang for your buck. A week in Bolivia can cost you about $293 (per person), while a week in Uruguay may cost you around $442. These differences become even more noticable if you plan to spend a longer time in the country. 10 days, two weeks, or even one month of travel to Bolivia or Uruguay can really add to your travel budget.

Accommodation is often cheaper in Bolivia compared to Uruguay ($13 vs. $28). Budget travelers usually stay in less expensive hostels and guest houses, while nicer hotels often appeal to families and upscale travelers.

Compare hotel prices here: