A Travel Comparison for Vacations, Honeymoons, and Tours Ecuador vs. Colombia

Should you visit Ecuador or Colombia?

Bordered by Colombia, Peru, and the beautiful Pacific Ocean, Ecuador is one of the smallest countries in South America but do not be fooled; there is plenty to see, do, and experience! Ecuador is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world. It boasts 50 ecosystems, from the Galapagos to tropical rainforests to forested valleys to the Andean mountains and with several hotspots that have been named UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Ecuador is a great destination because it offers so much in a territory that is about the same size as the state of Colorado. Ecuador is easy to explore, and a small setting will allow travelers to see numerous destinations without riding in a vehicle all day. Traveling from the Pacific Ocean to one of the highest mountains on earth, and then visiting the jungle can even be done in one day! Ecuador is all about adventure. Hiking, biking, kayaking, horseback riding, diving, swimming, rafting, trekking through the jungle, mountains or volcanoes and rewarding your hard work with a good dip in a hot spring or an hour or two on a tropical beach. And the great news is that there is no need to spend your time figuring out exchange rates because Ecuador has been using the U.S. Dollar as currency since 2000, when it retired the Sucre. With 530 miles of coastline, it's no surprise that Ecuador has some of the most beautiful beaches in South America. Coastal towns to visit include the popular Salinas and Puerto Lopez, Salango for snorkeling and scuba diving, and Atacames for the fantastic nightlife. Not to mention the Galapagos Islands. If you are seeking for some true adventure, travel to the Andes and the Cotopaxi National Park, where one of the highest active volcanoes in the world has erupted more than 50 times since 1738. Ecuador blends Spanish culture with African and European influences, and this vibrancy is reflected in the people and its cities. As Ecuador's capital, Quito is where you are heading for culture, stunning views, great nightlife especially karaoke bars, and local meals. And speaking of food, the country's cuisine is as diverse as its landscape. Hearty mountain fare and seafood make up Ecuador's national dishes, which include a citrusy ceviche, toasted corn snacks, a cheesy potato soup, pan-fried pork and chicken, goat stew and guinea pig. In city centers, visitors will find museums, theaters, thriving markets, festivals, and very welcoming people.

Long synonymous with drug cartels, kidnappings and corruption, the last two decades have seen Colombia evolve from failed narco state into one of Latin America's greatest destination. New restaurants, boutique hotels and craft breweries are appearing across Bogota, as local entrepreneurs capitalize on the country's newfound peace. In 2013, Medellin was voted the world's most innovative city: art, tourism and an impressive new cable car network have all contributed to the rebirth of this incredible city. You will see sculptures scattered around Medellin from Fernando Botero, the figurative painter and sculptor famed for his satirical works, which feature oversized subjects in exaggerated form. In addition, Bogota's decision to decriminalize graffiti in 2011 marked a creative new era for the city, whose flyovers, office blocks and municipal walls became canvases for some of the world's most exceptional street art. Cartagena is one of the most fabulous colonial cities in Latin America. You can dance in all-night salsa clubs in the southern city of Cali, which has the honorable distinction of being Colombia's salsa capital.

Colombia has plenty of hidden treasures. Trekking to the ruins of the mysterious Ciudad Perdida is one of Colombia's most rewarding adventures. Constructed some 650 years before Peru's Machu Picchu, Ciudad Perdida was only re-discovered in 1976. This ancient city is hidden in dense jungle atop the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, a six-day hike from the nearest town. Mompox is also not very easy to access and has largely been bypassed by tourists, but it is well worth making an effort for. Not only is this sleepy city a place of beauty, with its well-preserved architecture and riverside location, but it was also the inspiration behind Gabriel Garcia Márquez's magical realism novel, One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Colombia also has some wonderful popular attractions such as an underground salt cathedral in the quiet, colonial city of Zipaquira, a short drive or train trip from Bogota, a heritage railway, which offers a unique perspective on Bogota and the surrounding countryside, and the Guatape Lake, which is actually the result of a controversial dam. Colombia is also home to one of South America's prettiest national parks.

Tayrona National Park has all the attributes you want from the Caribbean, swaying palms, sandy beaches, limpid lagoons but being a protected area in Colombia's northern wilderness, this coastal reserve is refreshingly free of development. Colombia also has one of the world's biggest carnivals. The Barranquilla Carnival takes place 40 days before Holy Week, and the streets are filled with parades and parties, a big attraction for tourists, who are warmly received by locals.

Which country is cheaper, Colombia or Ecuador?

Should I visit Ecuador or Colombia? This is a popular question for many travelers. By figuring out which country is more expensive, you'll understand where you'll get more bang for your buck. A week in Colombia can cost you about $204 (per person), while a week in Ecuador may cost you around $354. These differences become even more noticable if you plan to spend a longer time in the country. 10 days, two weeks, or even one month of travel to Colombia or Ecuador can really add to your travel budget.

Accommodation is often cheaper in Colombia compared to Ecuador ($9.40 vs. $16). Budget travelers usually stay in less expensive hostels and guest houses, while nicer hotels often appeal to families and upscale travelers.

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